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Furylight — Dark Sage/Paperwhite/Silvery Grey/Cherry — Pickup, macros, thoughts

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Continuing the legacy of the 1994 Instapump Fury is a tough act. With this, the Furylight, Reebok have taken the DNA of that 21-year-old futureshoe and created a modern-day, super-lightweight, prodigal son. Or have they? Read on…

First images of this shoe from a few months back revealed an eye-catching, contemporary mesh-uppered lightweight runner with obvious aspirations to the likes of the Nike Roshe Run, Free series and Adidas Boost. 

Let’s be clear from the outset: here is NO Hexalite in this shoe, nor is there a Pump mechanism, the replacement fastening mechanisms are surprisingly practical: bungee laces. Slip the shoe on and just a quick tug to tighten – no tying required. Effortless.

The shoe also features Reeboks’ 3D Ultralite midsole tech, something I’m afraid I have little personal knowledge about but it’s clearly lightweight, gives good ‘walk feel’ and here features a speckled treatment, which I love anyway —

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The Dark Sage colourway dominates the upper and in real life appears Black, matching current street preference with the white midsole. The Cherry pops are subtle and perfectly added towards the rear of the shoe (notice the tongue pull loop is black while the rear is cherry) —

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The external bladder form of the OG Pump Fury inspired these padded upper details which directly connect the front upper section to the rear heel wrap section —

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The outsole has design elements again inspired by the Pump Fury, and packs a flatbed central section; this is a shoe for the street or light training sessions only —

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Cherry pull loops, debossed Reebok logo on rear tensile strap, and 3D Ultralite logos —

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From an entirely personal point of view, one of the only visual weaknesses is the elongated and detail-less appearance of the toebox from the higher than usual lacing down towards the toe wrap. I noticed on Reeboks’ original release images they appeared to hide this effect — so if you have large feet, this maybe emphasised further when worn. This photo should help illustrate what I mean —

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(above – notice the toebox bumpers which are again inspired by the Pump Fury). 

From a different point of view, this elongated front section may help the lateral view tapering effect towards the toes – again a very contemporary style. But as far as foot flex goes it all makes perfect sense – the 3D Ultralight midsole providing the mildest resistance to flex when worn. Form definitely appears to follow function in this case.

You’ll also notice that the shoe ISN’T labelled specifically as a Reebok Classics product; there is use of the Starcrest, but no Classics nomenclature on the shoe itself [ignoring the fact it came in a Reebok Classics box!]

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In overall wear my only disappointment is that wearing these sockless – as seems intended –  is not as comfortable and snug-fitting experience as other modern lightweights. This appears to be down to the design of the uppers’ central panelled section, which is set outside of the uppers’ meshed padding. However, it’s my only quibble really — I love this shoe, and am very excited that Reebok have developed it at all, regenerating the DNA from a legendary runner with both current lightweight tech and street style.

Is it a Retrobok? Well, not as such – more of a ‘Futurebok’ with a solid nod to history. Thanks again to Angela at Reebok for sending me these*. —BokOne

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Available from the following global stores (but no Asian stores I’ve seen as yet) —

Reebok (US)
Reebok (UK)
Zalando (UK)
AFewStore (Germany)

*Retrobok remains an independent blog, and is not paid or asked to promote Reebok in any way.

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Posted on March 10, 2015, in Newsfeed and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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